Spring Beauties

I enjoy looking at deciduous trees in the winter when there are no leaves to disguise their form and interesting bark.  I enjoy the colors of fall.  But, oh!  Spring is upon us here in middle Georgia – we might even say it is half past spring - and it is truly wonderful.

It is a remarkable season with beauty and the promise of more to come in the garden.  And I have to say that I have never enjoyed the season as much as I do living here on Elm Street.  Of course, there may be an age factor which figures in here: Just being happy to be able to greet another spring.  But the work of the eleven years we have put in here also figure in the pleasure Robert and I both derive from this place.

Words can get a bit trite when attempting to sing the glories of spring, so I’ve put together a photo essay of some of the wonders of this season here at Elm Street Gardens.  There are roses, iris, evening primrose as well as vegetables and fruits.  And, of course, there is the promise of the delights of the summer garden to come. 

Suzy

Lady Banksia Rose is one of the first roses to bloom.

Lady Banksia Rose is one of the first roses to bloom.

An antique rose, Old Blush, is a climber that is early to bloom and was the last rose blooming last fall.

An antique rose, Old Blush, is a climber that is early to bloom and was the last rose blooming last fall.

A really glorious viburnum gives its all each spring.

A really glorious viburnum gives its all each spring.

Another one of our old climbing roses.  

Another one of our old climbing roses.  

Spirea precedes the viburnum with its trailing blooms.

Spirea precedes the viburnum with its trailing blooms.

Robert and Rives walk along the outside fence line which is planted with evening primroses.

Robert and Rives walk along the outside fence line which is planted with evening primroses.

Sugar Snap Peas bloom and produce plentifully.  They were started early in the warmer environment of one of the hoophouses.

Sugar Snap Peas bloom and produce plentifully.  They were started early in the warmer environment of one of the hoophouses.

One of our wonderful green Kadota figs has started to fruit.

One of our wonderful green Kadota figs has started to fruit.

We first dug this iris from Robert's mother's garden on Lookout Mountain, moved it to Atlanta and after it had spread over the years, dug some more and brought them to Sparta.

We first dug this iris from Robert's mother's garden on Lookout Mountain, moved it to Atlanta and after it had spread over the years, dug some more and brought them to Sparta.

Oh boy!  Here come the strawberries.

Oh boy!  Here come the strawberries.

Well, it is not exactly a bloom or a fruit, but the leaves and stems of the Swiss Chard make it one of the most colorful vegetables in the garden.

Well, it is not exactly a bloom or a fruit, but the leaves and stems of the Swiss Chard make it one of the most colorful vegetables in the garden.

Here come the oak leaf hydrangea blooms!

Here come the oak leaf hydrangea blooms!

15 Elm Street, Sparta, GA