Marching On

Seems that the month of March came in like a lamb for us on Elm Street this year.  We’ve made it through a snow (not all bad and rather pretty) and an ice storm (treacherous with rough days here with no power, no water and trees and tree limbs down all over our part of middle Georgia).  So although March is off to a good start, we are a bit antsy about the coming weather. 


The grounds and gardens on Elm Street did not suffer any structural damage or serious crop loss from the ice storm, but there was plenty of clean up work to do.  I am still praising Robert’s foresight in keeping our trees trimmed so that hoop houses and garden beds were spared any major damage from falling branches. 


We have had some warmish times since the ice storm and Jim says that on those warmer days you can practically watch plants grow.  The plants in the hoop houses are happy and looking great and the outdoor crops, protected with row covers for the more tender plantings, looked better with each day of warmer weather that February could muster up for us. 


Weather has been the big topic for me in these blogs of late.  Well, I guess that is what comes of having a garden; we are always watching the weather.  Now I am just hoping that March stays lamb-like and doesn’t do the lion routine!

Suzy

One of many such scenes after the ice storm here at Elm Street.  Broken limbs from magnolias and many other trees littered the grounds.

One of many such scenes after the ice storm here at Elm Street.  Broken limbs from magnolias and many other trees littered the grounds.

And then there was this big tree that went down across the street.  Our mushroom man, Jonathan Tescher, just missed being hit by it.

And then there was this big tree that went down across the street.  Our mushroom man, Jonathan Tescher, just missed being hit by it.

it's hard to keep a good daylily down!  And here come those that are planted at each end of our main garden rows.  It's a sure sign that there is hope for spring.  

it's hard to keep a good daylily down!  And here come those that are planted at each end of our main garden rows.  It's a sure sign that there is hope for spring.  

Nothing says that winter will be over soon like daffodils!

Nothing says that winter will be over soon like daffodils!

Onions and garlic have been planted and growing in the outdoor beds for some time now.  This is our own Elm Street Garlic.  We found it growing on what is now our flower bank when we first moved to Elm Street. Its good performance is testimony that native plants are best.

Onions and garlic have been planted and growing in the outdoor beds for some time now.  This is our own Elm Street Garlic.  We found it growing on what is now our flower bank when we first moved to Elm Street. Its good performance is testimony that native plants are best.

Another wonderful sign of spring.

Another wonderful sign of spring.

The bulbs on the flower bank start to show their spring colors.

The bulbs on the flower bank start to show their spring colors.

The garden beds in March:  The 'tender" crops have their row covers handy and ready for covering up in case it is to get to freezing.

The garden beds in March:  The 'tender" crops have their row covers handy and ready for covering up in case it is to get to freezing.

15 Elm Street, Sparta, GA